REY-ZORRO
★ THIS IS NOT A BLOG ★

IT IS A DIS_INSTALLATION

DESIGN:

LIQUID SKY D_SIGN NYC /

CREATIVE DIRECTOR

LSD_SIGN NYC

ASTROGIRL ©REY
REY-ZORRO
+

Jessica Stam/Dior Fall Winter 2007
+
997:

Maison Martin Margiela SS 08
+
haha
+
TRENTEMOLLER - SYCAMORE FEELING
Jesper Just - No Man Is an Island II (2004)
+
lesliaisonsdemarieantoinette:

LES LIAISONS DE MARIE ANTOINETTE | MARIE ANTOINETTE 2006
+
magictransistor:

Brazil directed by Terry Gilliam. Embassy International. 1985
magictransistor:

Brazil directed by Terry Gilliam. Embassy International. 1985
magictransistor:

Brazil directed by Terry Gilliam. Embassy International. 1985
magictransistor:

Brazil directed by Terry Gilliam. Embassy International. 1985
magictransistor:

Brazil directed by Terry Gilliam. Embassy International. 1985
+
liquidskyberlin:

somewhere in berlin
#scrt_brln
+
+
damienhirstworld:

Beautiful Love Strummerville Painting with Beautiful Butterflies, 2008
by Damien Hirst
+
huh…
+
strandbooks:

Pamphlet found in the dictionary.
strandbooks:

Pamphlet found in the dictionary.
strandbooks:

Pamphlet found in the dictionary.
+
hermippe-pixelart:

進撃のロボット_Robots march
+
darksilenceinsuburbia:

Pinar Yolaçan
Yolaçan’s models are fading relics of the British Empire, the distant descendants (the Turkish photographer imagines) of women who were married to the administrators of distant colonies. Now it is they who submit to the scrutiny of the lens. And it is they who now bear the badges of primitiveness.

Beyond the issues of race and unevenly distributed power, however, there is a more profound question: the confused and contradictory relationship we have with the animal kingdom. Claude Lévi-Strauss famously proposed ‘the raw and the cooked’ as symbolic equivalents to nature and culture, noting that of all the animal species only humans cook food. But Yolaçan reminds us of a simpler truth: we are what we eat. Text by William A Ewing
Website
darksilenceinsuburbia:

Pinar Yolaçan
Yolaçan’s models are fading relics of the British Empire, the distant descendants (the Turkish photographer imagines) of women who were married to the administrators of distant colonies. Now it is they who submit to the scrutiny of the lens. And it is they who now bear the badges of primitiveness.

Beyond the issues of race and unevenly distributed power, however, there is a more profound question: the confused and contradictory relationship we have with the animal kingdom. Claude Lévi-Strauss famously proposed ‘the raw and the cooked’ as symbolic equivalents to nature and culture, noting that of all the animal species only humans cook food. But Yolaçan reminds us of a simpler truth: we are what we eat. Text by William A Ewing
Website
darksilenceinsuburbia:

Pinar Yolaçan
Yolaçan’s models are fading relics of the British Empire, the distant descendants (the Turkish photographer imagines) of women who were married to the administrators of distant colonies. Now it is they who submit to the scrutiny of the lens. And it is they who now bear the badges of primitiveness.

Beyond the issues of race and unevenly distributed power, however, there is a more profound question: the confused and contradictory relationship we have with the animal kingdom. Claude Lévi-Strauss famously proposed ‘the raw and the cooked’ as symbolic equivalents to nature and culture, noting that of all the animal species only humans cook food. But Yolaçan reminds us of a simpler truth: we are what we eat. Text by William A Ewing
Website
darksilenceinsuburbia:

Pinar Yolaçan
Yolaçan’s models are fading relics of the British Empire, the distant descendants (the Turkish photographer imagines) of women who were married to the administrators of distant colonies. Now it is they who submit to the scrutiny of the lens. And it is they who now bear the badges of primitiveness.

Beyond the issues of race and unevenly distributed power, however, there is a more profound question: the confused and contradictory relationship we have with the animal kingdom. Claude Lévi-Strauss famously proposed ‘the raw and the cooked’ as symbolic equivalents to nature and culture, noting that of all the animal species only humans cook food. But Yolaçan reminds us of a simpler truth: we are what we eat. Text by William A Ewing
Website
+
inneroptics:

Holly Solomon 1976-ROBERT MAPPLETHORPE